Does Your Handwriting Give Your Eating Disorder Away?

There are clues to handwriting that show the signs of eating disorders.  Handwriting Analysts can pick these out, as a doctor can pick out the enlarged muscles on the lower part of your back from constant bending and purging for bulimics.

Did you also know that changing your handwriting can change your life?  I know.  I have made the necessary changes in my own handwriting to make a difference, and I have, as have others, noticed these new positive character traits.HandwritingQueen

I am a grapho-therapist and handwriting analyst.  I can’t guarantee that it works for everyone – changing the letters which reflect your way of thinking, your frustrations, your obsessions, your dislikes.  But I know it did for me.  Looking back at my handwriting then and the one now and the difference in my thinking is indescribable.

If you want to take part in my study to see if this works for others, and you are suffering from an eating disorder, I invite you to send me your handwriting to bullimiaddict@gmail.com.  It is all highly confidential, and I will respond with a brief result, explanation of the traits and suggestion of changing certain letter forms to see if it works for you.

Understand this is not easy.  It took me six months to relearn my writing.  But it also changed me.  Again it is NOT a guarantee that it works.  All I know it did for me.

Handwriting analysis, by the way, is not some clairvoyant psychic phenomena.  It is a science that has been studied much over the years.  It is, as Dr. Wilhelm Preyer stated almost 90 years ago, “writing is basically a neurological process.  To (make the pen) write, the brain must transmit messages through the nervous system to the muscles that guide the pen.  It is the coordination of the brain, the nerves and muscles that determine such basic writing characteristics as the pressure, smoothness of line, ink distribution, shape and spacing of letters and forth.”

The brief results are free conditional on agreeing to return the favor of letting me know six months later if the suggestions of changing the writing, and henceforth proceeding in doing so, have had an effect on you.

If you do decide to go ahead and send me your handwriting, please do so on a blank page with as many letters as you can and in cursive.  I don’t care how messy the writing is.  It has no impact on the outcome.  Also a signature, if willing, speaks volumes.  Again, all is held in the highest of confidentiality.  Content is also insignificant, as I rarely read the words, I’m more interested in the letters and the format.  There is also the option of sending a “real” letter.  I would provide you with my mailing address to do so.  It does increase the accuracy.  Otherwise, however, it can be scanned and emailed.

If you have any further questions, you know you can contact me.  Again it’s bullimiaddict@gmail.com.

To those who choose to do this, thank you in advance.

0 Replies to “Does Your Handwriting Give Your Eating Disorder Away?”

  1. Wow! This is really interesting. I’m super curious but I don’t know which hand writing to send you… I have about 3-4 different styles of handwriting – and when I say different, I mean DIFFERENT… I’ve often wondered if that meant something on its own… I don’t have any sort of dissociative identity disorder though… Do people often write differently when they are in different moods, or do generally, people have the same writing all the time? Sometimes I really have to even concentrate on my signature so I sign it the same way it is on the card… is that odd? I once had my signature analysed by a hand-writing analyst and she was quite confounded. She watched me sign, noticed I started with my last name first, then went back and put my first initial, significantly larger than the capital letter of my last name, followed by two emphatic dots – one after my first initial and one at the end of my last name. I love finding out about this stuff… can’t wait for you to write more on it! 🙂

    1. Just to let you know, no matter what changes you have in your writing there are characteristics that remain the same in all the different writing styles. It’s not unusual for handwriting to change based on moods. Example, if you are taking notes at a meeting, you might write more on an upward slant (analytical), while if you are writing a letter to a friend, it may slant slightly or muchly over to the right, depending on your personality type. These characteristics are applied to the other character traits (called stacking) to come up with a “bigger picture” of one’s personality. 🙂

  2. Indeed very interesting. Wow. I would wonder what you really can tell from someone’s writing. Interested in sending something if you would like, snail mail is good for me. Would you like something from 4 years ago and then now?

    Curious Dawn 🙂

  3. Is your offer still open to do an analysis of my hand writing?
    If yes can I send it through snail mail?
    I’m willing to apply your suggestions and follow up as you request.

    1. Absolutely Gel! Just send it to L. Campbell, 6951 Derry Road, Building B, PO 40046, Derry Heights PO, Milton, ON, Canada L9T 7W4. Understand, however, that when I give you the information to follow, it’s important to do this every day for 30 days straight. If you miss a day or two, you need to start all over again. It takes 30 days for any of this to really start taking effect. Some will try, then stop, then say it doesn’t work. It does. You just have to be consistent!! 🙂 And starting over is okay. Just need to make sure it’s 30 days in a row. Believe it or not I’m even working on my own. I managed to get through two characteristic changes I needed. One was my self-confidence, and the other was my secrecy. (Overly. Secrecy is okay, but my was even self-deceptive). Then I worked on the hooks I had that reflect anger towards the opposite sex or overly challenging. (mine was not the latter). Fixed that too. Now it’s my physical frustration. 🙂 Once all that is in check, I should be good to go! And once I have the first 10 people from this site agree to my handwriting analysis (have two, you being three) I will be offering it at a decent rate and want to start specializing with people with eating disorders. I’d also like to go back to school to become a counsellor. But one step at a time. 🙂

      1. This sounds like a really interesting project you are doing.
        I don’t know if I am a good person to work with because I am currently doing another form or neurological repatterning using developmental movement patterns. It might be so different as to not conflict but I think it does have a similar goal of changing brain patterns to change dysfunctional stuff about how we live feel think etc.

        What do you think?

        I have written about it at my blog if you want to see more about it there.
        http://gentleperseverence.wordpress.com/2012/08/30/neurological-repatterning-developmental-movement-and-my-recovery/
        And here:
        http://gentleperseverence.wordpress.com/2012/10/09/neuro-movement-evalutation-follow-up-the-movement-prescription/

  4. Hi There
    I’m wondering if you got my comment above and the question in it? I’m waiting for your feedback. Not sure if the hand writing analysis and your ‘prescription’ would work since I’m already doing a different form of neurological repatterning….But I’m still curious….

  5. Gel, good question. I will look into this, but I really do believe one cannot hurt the other. Handwriting is proprietary, something we alone own. How we think is hence transferred in our penmanship. Having said this, I hope you are keeping a diary that is hand written in cursive and see if you notice a change? It might be where to start.

    1. Hi,
      It makes sense to me that one type of patterning wouldn’t hurt another patterning process. I just didn’t know if it would muddy the results as to which type of patterning was working.

      I have not been keeping a diary that is hand written in cursive. I usually write by printing. always have. Usually when I try to do all cursive, I get some printing mixed in. But I’ll try to see if I can do all cursive. Maybe I should try a daily writing exercise anyway.

      I’ll think on this a bit and if I decide I can commit to it (and the 30 days of writing you wrote about) , then I’ll send you some of my hand writing to get your input. I just want to be sure it’s realistic that I’d do it, follow through so you aren’t wasting your time giving me the prescription.

      Thanks!
      I hope you are well.

      1. Interesting that you print mostly. Usually a sign of not wanting people to know you intimately. Hiding of emotions. Why most men print. Harder to analyze, but still doable. You could always start with making a decision first on whether you believe in the ability to analyze a character. If you want, just email me a scanned paragraph and it doesn’t matter what you write. Up to you. Bullimiaddict@gmail.com if you want.

        1. How interesting indeed!….to me, printing means it’s more legible for me to read and for others to read. So in that sense it expresses my desire to communicate, to be known and understood by others. That is how I see it. I’ve always found it interesting that most peoples writing is hard to read whether it is printed or cursive.

          On the other hand it’s true that I am private and learned to not show emotions very early in life….that was a survival strategy. Not because I didn’t want people to know me, but because it made me more vulnerable to abuse.

          Thanks for taking the time to converse about this topic with me.

          Have you been able to work with other people on their handwriting?

          1. I’ve done over 300 reports on handwriting analysis. It intrigues me so much that I am taking my Mastery, and then want to go on to Forensic (covered partially in the Mastery), which would work well with my private investigation license. I always believed there was truth to penmanship relating to the one who holds the pen. So far it’s proven to be accurate. I am working with a couple of people on the changing of the handwriting, but it’s difficult to do unless the person chooses to absolutely dedicate 30 days to doing so. We are all so busy in our lives, that sometimes it is difficult to commit. I understand this, but for anything to work, it takes effort and dedication.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *